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Unfortunately we are currently out of live mealworms and mini mealworms due to a national shortage. We are expecting this to last for at least another two weeks but as soon as they are in stock we will have them back online here, so keep checking back on the web for any updates. We do have stock of dried mealworms and live waxworms which your birds will both enjoy.

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Bokashi active bran

Composting in an Apartment

By Rob 1 years ago

With more and more people in the UK house sharing or living in an apartment, the space outside is increasingly scarce but that shouldn’t stop us from growing or indeed composting.

A Bokashi Bean Trench

By Heather 9 years ago

Bean trenches are one of those traditional garden techniques that seem to have lost a bit of favour. The idea is that you dig a trench, line it with newspaper, fill it with your kitchen waste, before covering with soil and planting your beans - so adding lots of fertility and moisture-retention to the soil. Sounds like a good idea but a bit of hard work though, especially as some gardeners recommend starting in the autumn and filling it throughout the winter.

I've decided to try a quick fix with the contents of my Bokashi bin. The fermented kitchen waste is absolutely packed full of nutrients and micro-organisms, or EMs (Effective Micro-organisms) will rot down quickly and hopefully form the perfect growing medium for my heritage seed swapped bean seeds.

The Big Bokashi-thon

By Heather 10 years ago


We are always being asked what to do with Bokashi Compost when it has finished pickling and how long it then takes to break down. This is a bit like one of those ‘How long is a piece of string?’ questions, but in a spirit of scientific exploration we decided to set up an experiment to find out.

First of all, don your white lab coat and the nerdy scientist’s specs, and pick up your clipboard. Now you can start the experiment...

When your bin is full, drain off any Bokashi Juice and feed to your plants or smelly drains (you might want to measure the quantity).

Seal your bokashi bin and leave it to ferment. Drain off any liquid in this time.

After 2 weeks it’s ready! Open it up and have a look. Is there any mould, if so what colour is it?
Now decide on your next step, here are some ideas:


  • Put it in your wormery (perhaps just half of the bin or less if your worms aren’t used to it.)

  • Put in your compost bin or heap (will you mix it in spread it in layers or just up-end the bucket, no doubt losing the sump at the same time – well that’s what happens with mine!)

  • Dig it into your garden. Again you can experiment with depths (although at least deep is recommended), layering or mixing it in).

Now it’s up to you to check it monthly, or more often and see what happens. Let us know your results.

Now if this was a really truly scientific experiment, we’d have weighed and noted the exact contents of the kitchen waste we were putting in to begin with, not to mention the amount of Bokashi Active Bran added as well. We’d probably record the air temperature where we left it to ferment, and for sure, we’d make sure we had a control bucket too, full of un-Bokashi’d waste.

We haven’t, but that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t.
Here are some sites that you might want to take a look at to see how other people's experiments are going: The Wiggly Wigglers Facebook Group

Simon Sherlock’s blog

Podchef’s blog