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Unfortunately we are currently out of live mealworms and mini mealworms due to a national shortage. We are expecting this to last for at least another two weeks but as soon as they are in stock we will have them back online here, so keep checking back on the web for any updates. We do have stock of dried mealworms and live waxworms which your birds will both enjoy.

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apple trees

APPLE TREES from Wiggly Wigglers

By Heather 7 years ago

If you would like to have your own fruit here is a great selection of apples includes the most popular garden favourites from the early ripening Discovery to the delicious Cox to the world’s best cooking apple the Bramley. Most are self fertile but to ensure pollination choose any 4 trees sorts the job a treat.

We have trees are supplied in pots but bare root is best in terms of cost and they establish quickly and develop a healthy root system.

M9 and M27 rootstocks will produce a dwarf tree of about 8ft high to be planted about 6ft apart; MM106 and MM111 will produce a semi-vigorous tree of about 12ft to be planted about 15ft apart.

The larger the tree the greater the yield of fruit. Trees should be planted as soon as possible – makes sure that the soil is not frozen and the air temperature is above freezing. Soak the roots in a bucket of water for an hour before planting. If you are unable to plant the trees straight away they can be kept for a week in their packaging in a cool dry place such as a garden shed.

Red Falstaff ®
The select red sport of ‘Falstaff ’.Fruity, well balanced flavour, crisp and juicy.Frost resistant and self fertile.One of the heaviest yielding varieties.Can be stored easily and eaten throughout the winter.Highly recommended for every garden. (Norfolk 1983)



Bramley's SeedlingThe finest cooker in the world!Green to greenishyellow with a strong acid flavour. (Nottingham 19th Century)

James Grieve Red flush stripes over pale green.Crisp and juicy.Excellent flavour and reliable cropper – deservedly popular. (Edinburgh 1893)

Sunset
Similar to Cox but more disease resistant and slightly earlier.Red stripes and orange flush over gold.Sharp intense flavour.Heavy cropper.Excellent garden apple. (Ightham, Kent 1918)

Fiesta ®Syn : Red PippinCox’s Orange Pippin x Idared.Rich, aromatic and sweet with a crisp texture.Excellent garden tree with Cox-like characteristics.Very heavy crops.Ideal for northern areas. (Kent 1972)

LimelightDiscovery x Greensleeves.This improved Greensleeves type is abundant in cropping.The apple has a clean, smooth finish and seems to glow when ripe with the occasional attractive pink blush.It is crisp, refreshing, and very disease resistant.Makes a neat, compact tree.Bred by Hugh Ermen. (Kent 2000)

Newton Wonder Very late keeping, large yellow and scarlet.Cooks to a juicy, mild purée.Later in season makes fruity eating apple.Good in salads, stuffing and mincemeat. (Melbourne, Derbyshire 19th Century)

Blenheim Orange
Yellow-gold fruit has orange flush and a few red stripes.Nutty taste, sweet crumbly texture.An old favourite – cooks, eats and keeps well.When baked it keeps its shape and will produce a thick purée. (Oxford 1740)

Worcester Pearmain
Reliable crop of delicious orange-red fruit.Firm, juicy flesh is very sweet with strong strawberry flavour.A seedling of Devonshire Quarrenden.At its best when ripened on the tree and just before it falls off. (Worcester 19th Century)

Discovery
Worcester Pearmain x Beauty of Bath.Bright red flush.Crisp and juicy with a hint of strawberry.An excellent early dessert apple with good disease resistance. (Langham, Essex 1949)

Kidd`s Orange Red
Cox’s Orange Pippin and Delicious (direction uncertain).Sweet, crisp and aromatic, with a good balance of sugar and acidity.A good Cox alternative. (New Zealand 1924)

Golden Delicious
Well known crisp eater.Greenish-yellow turning gold.Sweet, honey flavour.Flavour is superior to imported fruit when grown in the UK. (USA 19th Century)

Egremont Russet
The flesh is cream, tinged yellow, sweet and firm with a rich nutty flavour.The usual russet to be found in shops. (Sussex 19th Century)

Cox Self Fertile
A self fertile form of Cox’s Orange Pippin highly recommended for less than ideal Cox areas.Heavy crops of the best eating apple in the world. (Bristol 1975)

Laxton`s Superb
Wyken Pippin x Cox’s Orange Pippin.Sweet and aromatic possessing certain similarities to Cox.Can become biennial bearing.A good substitute for Cox’s Orange Pippin in colder exposed areas.Purple flush and red stripes give this an old fashioned attractive appearance. (Bedford, 1897)

Saturn ®
Falstaff x Cox’s Orange Pippin.Very resistant to scab.Heavy crops of attractive, red blushed, conical fruit.Juicy, crisp and refreshing.Not particularly aromatic. (HRI, East Malling, Kent 1980)

Grenadier
Easy to grow, large early fruit which cooks to a sharp purée.The tree is compact making it ideal for the garden.A very good pollinator for Bramley. (Bucks. 19th Century)

Pixie
Good crops of small apples ideal for children, yellow with attractive red stripes and orange-red flush.Finely flavoured, rich with plenty of sugar.Keeps well.The picture shows ‘Red Pixie’, a sport with more attractive colour. (RHS Wisley, 1947)

Six facts about mistletoe and how to grow it

By Heather 11 years ago


It might seem to be the wrong time of the year to be writing about mistletoe, but it’s at this time of the year when the berries are at their ripest and ready to introduce to your tree or shrub.


  • There are over a thousand mistletoe species worldwide, but the one we are most familiar with is the native British mistletoe, Viscum album.

  • Traditionally we associate mistletoe with apple trees, but you can also use hosts such as poplar, lime and hawthorn trees.

  • Mistletoe is one of a number of parasitic plants, gaining some of it’s nutrients from a root under the host’s bark.

  • The common name of mistletoe is derived from the berries being eaten by birds, usually the Mistle Thrush. The seeds are excreted by birds, complete with sticky mucus, and attach to the host tree or bush.

  • Mistletoe takes several years to become established. In the first year they bond with their host plant and only in the following year will produce leaves. The picture above shows a three year old mistletoe plant.

  • Avoid placing seeds on your most prolific apple tree as mistletoe can severely affect the crop. They are best placed on an older tree where cropping is not an issue.

To learn more about all things mistletoe take a look at these sites:The Mistletoe Pages Jonathan Briggs' blog Mistletoe TravelsThe Tenbury Wells Mistletoe Festival