LIVE! Mini Mealworms

More Views

LIVE! Mini Mealworms

Mini Mealworms will be back in stock on Friday 28th April



Minis are young mealworms (13 to 18mm long). As with the other mealworm species we supply their diet is vegetarian.



Mini Mealworms are young mealworms so much smaller so a good alternative to adult mealworms when your birds are feeding really tiny chicks.

- Very popular with wild birds.
- Consists of over 50% crude protein
- Completely safe and natural to use.
- Suitable for Soft bills, insectivorous birds and Finches
- From our farm to your feeder.

3 tubs (120g) - £8.95
6 tubs (240g) - £15.75
500g - £20.25
1kg - £38.95

PLEASE READ:

Orders under 2kg, where the £3.95 delivery option is selected, are automatically sent with Royal Mail 1st Class. Please note that this can take 1-3 days to arrive depending on the postal service in your area. Larger orders will be automatically sent via courier on a 48 hour service.

If you would prefer the order to be sent via courier, please select the £5.95 Next Day option and choose a delivery date from the calendar.

Ordering for delivery overseas. We are able to dispatch live waxworms overseas but please note that this will incur an extra delivery charge and we would not be able to guarantee the condition of the waxworms upon arrival or issue a refund. By paying the extra delivery charge, you are agreeing to accept the order at your own risk.
F0056-bf1

Availability: In stock

£8.95
£8.95

Details

Minis are young mealworms (13 to 18mm long). As with the other mealworm species we supply their diet is vegetarian. This means that they are safe to feed to birds and cannot pass on diseases which may be found in larvae fed on meat, such as maggots. Particularly moist, Minis are very suitable for feeding to fledglings as they are unable to obtain water by drinking.

Write Your Own Review

Only registered users can write reviews. Please, log in or register

Customer Reviews

Great for feeding to your hens Review by Shirley Stafford
Review
Great for feeding to your hens. Mine love them. I buy the mini ones as you get more for your money and they last ages if you take care of them plus they keep growing so after a few weeks they a big and juicy!!! I have six hens so I buy them by the kilo.
(Posted on 04/01/2013)
The live mealworms are great. Review by Ron Legate
Review
The live mealworms are great. Within minutes of putting out the first helping as suggested in the instructions our resident pair of robins were in and clearly enjoying a very tasty addition to their daily diet. Just one problem. Within the next 10 minutes a starling scouting for food sources brought his gang along, about 30 in all, and obliterated the worms within seconds. And continue to do so. I have tried bringing worms closer to the house to put them off but I'm afraid it makes no difference. Our robins are getting a few but they must be very quick. Other grub loving birds do not stand a chance.
Any suggestions on how I might discourage the gang of starlings. (Posted on 04/01/2013)
We have been using Live food for a while now and we have a line of birds on the fence outside our patio door waiting for their breakfast and tea. Review by David Lawson
Review
We have been using Live food for a while now and we have a line of birds on the fence outside our patio door waiting for their breakfast and tea.
In reply to Ron's starling problem, we have had a similar experience with the table being emptied within seconds, our solution was to put the worms out earlier morning and later evening, starlings are last out of and first into bed so it gives others a chance. (Posted on 04/01/2013)
The starlings need the mealworms probably even more than Robins, whose numbers are stable. Review by lisa
Review
Starling numbers have decreased by 50% since the 1970s, in some parts of Wales there are no starlings left. The starlings need the mealworms probably even more than Robins, whose numbers are stable.
(Posted on 04/01/2013)
My garden birds love mealworms Review by Brian Arbuckle
Review
My garden birds love mealworms too but I am always looking to find the best type of container to keep them in. Currently they are residing in the garage in a spare compost kitchen caddy filled with out of date porridge oat flakes and with the lid propped open to allow air circulation. I wonder though if a small wormery might be ideal to keep them in? They seem to have voracious appetites for carrot and apple peelings etc so could be effective at dealing with kitchen waste? So Wiggly Wigglers, how about a "Can - o - Mealworms"?
(Posted on 04/01/2013)
The robin loves the wrigglers but a sneaky Magpie has latched on to them as well Review by Binky
Review
The robin loves the wrigglers but a sneaky Magpie has latched on to them as well...he makes a really loud cracky cawing when he gets them too. My Rudd in the pond play 'chase me' with them as they are too big for one mouthful, very funny to watch.
(Posted on 04/01/2013)
Every morning I have a male blackbird and a robin waiting at one end of the garden for their meal of worms Review by Annie Lagrue
Review
Every morning I have a male blackbird and a robin waiting at one end of the garden for their meal of worms, which I dish up in an old ashtray, I've only just turned to walk away when the blackbird is there! I put meal worms in two or three places, with one regular black bird (male and female) having a regular place of their own to feed. It works for them and they don't squabble.
(Posted on 04/01/2013)
The birds clearly love the worms Review by Maria
Review
The birds clearly love the worms but I was rather disappointed to find out that the worms can eat through the paper bag they are supplied in. I came home to find many, many worms crawling all over my porch. a little warning would have been appreciated.
(Posted on 04/01/2013)
Made the mistake of decanting the latest bag of worms into their new home Review by Beth Hughes
Review
Made the mistake of decanting the latest bag of worms into their new home while sat in the garden - looked up to see the tweet had gone out and i was surrounded by expectant feathered friends lined up on the fences! They are very popular in our garden - hoping they will stop the blackbird catching the tadpoles in the pond as a tasty alternative!
(Posted on 04/01/2013)